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Thread: Pakistan's Drone & UAV Programs

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    Pakistan's Drone & UAV Programs

    Islamabad, which publicly condemns attacks by US drones on militants in tribal areas by the Afghan border, has built its own

    Pakistan is on the cusp of joining an elite group of countries capable of manufacturing unmanned aircraft capable of killing as well as spying, a senior defence official has claims.

    Publicly, Islamabad, which officially objects to lethal drone strikes carried out by the CIA along its border with Afghanistan, says it is only developing remote-controlled aircraft for surveillance purposes.

    But last week, during a major arms fair held in Karachi, military officials briefed some of Pakistan's closest allies about efforts by the army to develop its own combat unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV).

    "The foreign delegates were quite excited by what Pakistan has achieved," said the official, who was closely involved with organising the four-day International Defence Exhibition and Seminar (Ideas). "They were briefed about a UAV that can be armed and has the capability to carry a weapon payload."

    The official said Pakistan wanted to demonstrate to friendly countries, principally Turkey and the Gulf, that it can be self-sufficient in a technology that is revolutionising warfare and which is currently dominated by a handful of countries that do not readily share the capability.

    "It does not have the efficiency and performance as good as Predator," he said, referring to the US combat drone widely used to attack militant targets. "But it does exist."

    He gave no details about the capabilities of the aircraft, or even its name.

    Huw Williams, an expert on unmanned systems at Jane's Defence Weekly, expressed doubts that Pakistan could have succeeded in progressing very far from the "pretty basic" small reconnaissance drones, which the country publicly exhibited at the weapons show, including the Shahpar and Uqab aircraft developed by the state-owned consortium Global Industrial and Defence Solutions.

    "The smaller systems are not greatly beyond that of a model aircraft," he said. "But the larger, long-endurance drones are a step up in technology across the board."

    Only the US and Israel are currently believed to have drones that can fire missiles. China and Turkey are also working on large-scale combat drones.

    Both countries exhibited models of drones at the sprawling Karachi conference centre, which included Pakistani companies marketing everything from guns that shoot around corners to inflatable tanks intended to fox surveillance aircraft.

    The big claims about Pakistan's developing drone capacity highlights the enormous interest in the technology from armies around the world.

    "Everyone has been asking us whether our drones can carry weapons," said Raja Sabri Khan, chief executive of Integrated Dynamics, a company that showed off a wide range of small and mid-size reconnaissance drones. "But that's a business for the big boys only."

    Khan has been deliberately refocusing his company's efforts on smaller drones, many of which are launched by hand, which are mostly intended for civilian use.

    A Pakistani army colonel attending the exhibition, after recently finishing a tour fighting against militants in the country's border region, said such small drones were a vital tool.

    "We have these small drones, but not enough of them and we do not always get them when we have operations," said the colonel, who did not wish to be named. "They are excellent for observing the Taliban, their movements and deployments."

    It was the seventh arms fair hosted by Pakistan intended to show off the country's defence industry.

    Organisers conceded that this year had not been a major commercial success but were pleased with the turnout after the last event in 2010 had to be cancelled.

    Several exhibitors said Pakistani companies – many of which are directly owned by the country's military – offered a cheaper alternative to developing countries looking to buy everything from tanks to computer simulators used to train pilots.
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    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    Excellent development

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    If Muslim countries are ever to challenge the injustices they face the first steps to it will be the industrialisation and production of their own weapons
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    This was inevitable no one should be surprised

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    Retired AgNoStIc MuSliM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    If Muslim countries are ever to challenge the injustices they face the first steps to it will be the industrialisation and production of their own weapons
    I would argue that it is just as important, if not more, that Muslim countries take steps to rectify the injustices they perpetrate on religious minorities internally. Pakistan will never achieve its full potential so long as her government and society discriminate against Ahmadis and non-Muslims in various ways.

    On topic - talk of Pakistan developing an armed UAV has been doing the rounds for a few years now (reports of a UAV named the Burraq) and hopefully we will see a publicized flight test soon.
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    Senior Member Dash's Avatar
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    American Army generally classify UAVs in three tier concept:

    • Tier I UAVs are highly portable and can be hand launched (many can be carried in a soldier backpack). They are intended to allow small troop units to find out what’s happening behind the next building or on the other side of a nearby hill. Tier I UAV payload capacity is typically less than three to four pounds and their endurance is an hour or less.

    • Tier II UAVs can often be lifted by two men and might carry five to 30 pounds of payload, which could include several different types of sensors including EO, IR or SAR radar. These aircraft support larger troop formations with more wide-ranging missions and can operate out to the line-of-sight horizon, with endurance of as much as 12 hours or more.

    • Tier III UAVs rival small passenger aircraft in size and payload. They carry a wide range of sensors, including sophisticated on-board image and sensor data processing payloads. In recent years it is becoming increasingly commonplace that Tier III UAVs carry weapons so that they can fill a hunter/killer role, working in concert with ground warfighters to “find, fix and finish” a target. Examples of Tier III UAVs are the fixed wing General Atomics Predator and Northrop Grumman Global Hawk, or the rotary wing Boeing FireScout.

    The evolution of UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) and sensors means they will demand increasing amounts of bandwidth over time. A Predator currently has a primary 3.2-megabit (Mbps) return, but that will increase to 6.4 Mbps this year. Over the next few years, planners expect it to increase further to 16 Mbps and eventually to 45 Mbps by fiscal year 2015. Global Hawks can operate at data rates of up to 50 Mbps today, but they too will dramatically increase their requirements over time, eventually reaching 274 Mbps.

    The Pentagon is preparing to spend millions of dollars on UAVs through 2013. As the US military cannot fulfill the demand of bandwidth fo their UAVs/UAS’ and hire civil communication satellites, during this same period, commercial satellite operators intend to deploy more than 40 new satellites that will have ample capacity to meet these growing demands.

    The takeoff and landing s of tier III UAVs are controlled by the ground based control stations. When the UAV reaches a height of over 30,000, the controller at Langley or some other location may take over the controls of UAV operations via satellite connectivity. The armed UAV or UCAV (Unmanned Aerial Combat Vehicle) can hit targets from a distance of 8 km with Hellfire missiles.

    As Pakistan does not need to use such a UAV/UAS at very long ranges, it does not require satellite connectivity. I do not know which missile would be used with this UAV, however the range would certainly be less than 8 km. I hope that in the next upgrade, we can also mount an air to air missile, which can target hostile helicopters and aircraft, along with additional sensors.
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    Senior Member Dash's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    If Muslim countries are ever to challenge the injustices they face the first steps to it will be the industrialisation and production of their own weapons
    Quote Originally Posted by AgNoStIc MuSliM View Post
    I would argue that it is just as important, if not more, that Muslim countries take steps to rectify the injustices they perpetrate on religious minorities internally. Pakistan will never achieve its full potential so long as her government and society discriminate against Ahmadis and non-Muslims in various ways.
    I think both the things will have to be undertaken concurrently.
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    China Pakistan

    Pakistan struggles in race to develop armed drones

    Pakistan racing to develop armed drones but lacks key technology, China offer help



    Pakistan is secretly racing to develop its own armed drones, frustrated with U.S. refusals to provide the aircraft, but is struggling in its initial tests with a lack of precision munitions and advanced targeting technology.

    One of Islamabad's closest allies and Washington's biggest rivals, China, has offered to help by selling Pakistan armed drones it developed. But industry experts say there is still uncertainty about the capabilities of the Chinese aircraft.

    The development of unmanned combat aircraft is especially sensitive in Pakistan because of the widespread unpopularity of the hundreds of U.S. drone strikes against Taliban and al-Qaida militants in the country's rugged tribal region bordering Afghanistan.

    The Pakistani government denounces the CIA strikes as a violation of the country's sovereignty, though senior civilian and military leaders are known to have supported at least some of the attacks in the past. Pakistani officials also call the strikes unproductive, saying they kill many civilians and fuel anger that helps militants recruit additional fighters — allegations denied by the U.S.

    Pakistan has demanded the U.S. provide it with armed drones, claiming it could more effectively carry out attacks against militants. Washington has refused because of the sensitive nature of the technology and doubts that Pakistan would reliably target U.S. enemies. The U.S. has held talks with Pakistan about providing unarmed surveillance drones, but Islamabad already has several types of these aircraft in operation, and the discussions have gone nowhere.

    Inaugurating a defense exhibition in the southern city of Karachi last week, Pakistani Prime Minister Raja Pervaiz Ashraf indicated Islamabad would look for help from Beijing in response to U.S. intransigence.

    "Pakistan can also benefit from China in defense collaboration, offsetting the undeclared technological apartheid," said Ashraf.

    Pakistan has also been working to develop armed drones on its own, said Pakistani military officials and civilians involved in the domestic drone industry, all of whom spoke on condition of anonymity because of the classified nature of the work.

    Pakistan first began weapons tests seven or eight months ago with the Falco, an Italian drone used by the Pakistani air force for surveillance that has been modified to carry rockets, said a civilian with knowledge of the secret program. The military is also conducting similar tests with the country's newest drone, the Shahpur, he said. An unarmed version of the Shahpur was unveiled for the first time at the Karachi exhibition.

    The weapons tests have been limited to a handful of aircraft, and no strikes have been carried out in combat, said the civilian.

    Pakistan lacks laser-guided missiles like the Hellfire used on U.S. Predator and Reaper drones and the advanced targeting system that goes with it, so the military has been using unguided rockets that are much less accurate.

    While Hellfire missiles are said to have pinpoint accuracy, the rockets used by Pakistan have a margin of error of about 30 meters (100 feet) at best, and an unexpected gust of wind could take them 300 meters (1,000 feet) from their intended target, said the civilian. Even if Pakistan possessed Hellfires and the guidance system to use them, the missile's weight and drag would be a challenge for the small drones produced by the country.

    Pakistan's largest drone, the Shahpur, has a wingspan of about seven meters (22 feet) and can carry 50 kilograms (110 pounds). The U.S. Predator, which can be equipped with two Hellfire missiles, has a wingspan more than twice that and a payload capacity over four times as great.

    Pakistani drones also have much more limited range than those produced in the U.S. because they are operated based on "line of sight" using radio waves, rather than military satellites. The Shahpur has a maximum range of 250 kilometers (150 miles), while the Predator can fly over five times that distance.

    The British newspaper The Guardian reported Tuesday that Pakistan was working on an armed drone but did not provide details.


    The market for drones has exploded in Pakistan and other countries around the world in recent years, as shown by the array of aircraft on display at the defense exhibition in Karachi. Hoping to tap into a worldwide market worth billions of dollars a year, public and private companies wheeled out over a dozen drones that ranged in size from hand-held models meant to be carried in a backpack to larger aircraft like the Shahpur.

    All the Pakistani drones on display were advertised as unarmed and meant for surveillance only. One private company, Integrated Dynamics, even promotes its aircraft under the slogan "Drones for Peace." But several models developed by the Chinese government were marketed as capable of carrying precision missiles and bombs.

    The Chinese government has offered to sell Pakistan an armed drone it has produced, the CH-3, which can carry two laser-guided missiles or bombs, industry insiders said.

    Also being offered to Pakistan is a more advanced drone, the CH-4, which closely resembles a U.S. Reaper and can carry four laser-guided missiles or bombs, according to Li Xiaoli, a representative of the Chinese state-owned company that produces both the CH-3 and CH-4, Aerospace Long-march International Trade Co., Ltd.

    Pakistan has yet to purchase any armed Chinese drones because their capabilities have yet to be proven, but is likely to do so in the future, said the civilian with knowledge of the Pakistani military's drone program.

    Only a few countries, including the U.S., Britain and Israel, are known to have actually used armed drones in military operations.

    "China is a bit of a tough nut to crack as you'd expect," said Huw Williams, a drone expert at Jane's International Defense Review. "They frequently wheel out exciting looking aircraft but are yet to really demonstrate anything earthshattering."

    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/49867676...h_and_gadgets/
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    China Pakistan
    Our newest Shahpur bigger-size drone






    Pakistan also consider Long Wing (assemble of US MQ-9 Reaper)



    Details- Low-cost Chinese drone "Wing Loong" unveiled at Zhuhai show
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    Last edited by RaptorRX; 18th November 2012 at 23:10.

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    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Interesting development....
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    Meet Pakistan’s drone maker

    Meet Pakistan’s drone maker
    By Betwa Sharma | December 3, 2012, 12:00 AM PST

    Click image for larger version. 

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    SKYCAM 2, by Raja Sabri Khan.
    In Pakistan, public anger against drone attacks carried out by the United States continues to grow.

    From June 2004 through mid-September 2012, missiles from these unmanned aircrafts have killed 2,562 to 3,325 people in Pakistan, of whom 474-881 were civilians, including 176 children, according to the London-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism, an independent journalist organization. Its research shows that out of a total of 351 attacks, 299 were done under the Obama administration.

    The U.S. claims that these CIA-conducted drone attacks are the only way to kill militants and terrorists hiding in the mountainous terrain of northwest Pakistan. A report released by Stanford and New York Universities in September described these attacks as counterproductive for the U.S. and terrorizing for civilians residing in the targeted areas.

    In November, however, The Guardian reported that Pakistan is building its own combat drones.

    Raja Sabri Khan, a Pakistani aerospace design engineer, who has built drones for two decades, says that his country’s government doesn’t have the money to make combat drones yet.

    Khan, who heads Integrated Dynamics, a Karachi-based private company, has pioneered drone technology for civilian use. The engineer speaks with SmartPlanet about why he makes drones, his buyers as well as the costs and the risks involved.

    SP: For how long have you been making drones and why do you make them?

    RSK: I’ve been designing and making drones for over 20 years. Why? Why do people climb mountains? Aerospace technologies have always fascinated me and drones are a great learning platform.

    SP: What kind of drones do you make and what are they used for?

    RSK: I design drones for civilian and surveillance applications. These are mostly under 20 kg weight (40 lbs). The lightest SKYCAM is under a kg. There are numerous civilian applications that we are targeting from wildlife monitoring, agriculture, search and rescue to environmental and land use surveys.

    SP: What military purposes can your drones be put to?

    RSK: Aerial surveillance and early warning systems.

    SP: Can you elaborate a bit more on the civilian purposes for these drones? Perhaps a few examples of how your drones have been used outside of Pakistan?

    RSK: All of our exports to Europe and Australia have been for civilian applications including land mapping, agriculture, environmental studies and as platforms for research into full-size collision avoidance systems in passenger aircraft.

    SP: How long does it to make a drone and how much does it cost to make one?

    RSK: Our SKYCAM drone takes about two days to build and costs around $250. The complete system with a real time video feed to a ground station costs around $1000.

    SP: Who do you sell drones to and for how much?

    RSK: We cannot sell to individuals. All sales and exports are to organizations and government entities under end-user certification from the Government of Pakistan.

    SP: Do you have competition from other private drone-makers in Pakistan?

    RSK: None. We work on mostly civilian applications while the rest are concentrating on military applications.

    SP: The Pakistan military is reportedly making drones now. What’s your assessment of these drones?

    RSK: Actually several government R&D organizations in Pakistan are developing drones for military applications in Pakistan.

    SP: In the future, will Pakistani drones have the capability to carry out attacks like the U.S. Predator?

    RSK: Let me give you an example which might provide some clarity on this question and the perception that the press has about drones. Drones are aircraft without pilots. Many countries around the world have the capability of building light aircraft for passenger use or civilian applications but this does not mean that the technology can be extended into their being able to conduct a full-fledged fighter development program.

    An armed drone is a completely different animal from a surveillance drone in the same manner as a light aircraft, like a Cessna, differs from an F-18. Future capability means a lot of money in spending and complete commitment from the government’s point of view and this may not be an immediate priority.

    SP: China’s making drones as well. What’s your assessment of Chinese technology compared to the U.S.?

    RSK: I think the Chinese will be right up there very soon with the leading drone technology countries in the world including the USA and Israel.

    SP: There is big push back against drones in Pakistan because of the U.S. attacks. Are people angry with your work and have you ever been at risk?

    RSK: There is always a risk of being misunderstood, largely due to press hype, of the types of applications that our drones are capable of. I have always been a strong advocate for banning drone strikes. There are so many life-saving applications that can be realistically attempted using drones like search and rescue, flood early warning, avalanche monitoring and disaster management.

    We are attempting to promote these applications through our ‘Drones for Peace’ program and the SKYCAM system which will be available throughout the world for civilian life-saving applications.

    Photos provided by Raja Sabri Khan.

    Meet Pakistan’s drone maker | SmartPlanet
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    Pakistan Moves to Build Its Own Drones, Push Aside U.S.‏

    Pakistan Moves to Build Its Own Drones, Push Aside U.S.‏


    By DION NISSENBAUM / The Wall Street Journal
    KARACHI, Pakistan—This country's defense industry is building what companies hope will be a domestic fleet of aerial drones that can take over the U.S.'s role in attacking militant strongholds.

    The U.S.'s persistent use of armed drones to kill militants in remote parts of Pakistan has created a public backlash that has damaged the relationship between the two nations.

    American attempts to reduce the number of civilian casualties by tightening oversight of such strikes have done little to reduce popular opposition in Pakistan to the attacks nor mute Pakistani leaders' routine protests.

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    Dion Nissenbaum/The Wall Street Journal
    A Pakistani company showed its medium-range drone, the Shahpar, at a Karachi arms expo recently. Locally made drones lag their U.S. counterparts.


    But Pakistan isn't altogether against drones. The nation's leaders want to have more control over where and how they are used, and are encouraging local drone makers to build up the country's budding arsenal.

    "The future era is toward unmanned operations," said Sawd Rehman, deputy director of Rawalpindi, Pakistan-based Xpert Engineering, which builds aerial drones. "The policy of self-reliance is always priority No. 1 of every nation."

    Mr. Rehman is part of a new wave of executives in the Pakistani defense industry who have studied American drone strikes with a mix of scorn and envy. He and other Pakistanis view U.S. drone attacks on militant sanctuaries as counterproductive because of the anti-American hostility they have fueled.

    Instead, Xpert and a small number of other companies are working to develop the country's own fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles—a force they hope will one day supplant the American drones that dominate the country's border with Afghanistan.

    "We have tried our best asking the United States to transfer this technology to us so we can fight our own war instead of somebody from abroad coming and doing it," said Maj. Gen. Tahir Ashraf Khan, director general of Pakistan's Defense Export Promotion Organization. "Those efforts did not meet with success, so we decided to venture into this field ourselves—and we have gone pretty far ahead."

    Pakistan's military already uses a small but growing number of unarmed drones, some of them manufactured at home, to monitor the borders, coast and mountain ranges that serve as sanctuaries for some of the world's most wanted militant leaders, including the Taliban and its allied Haqqani Network.

    U.S. officials agreed last year to sell Islamabad several dozen small, unarmed Raven model drones with limited short-range surveillance capabilities. American officials have steadfastly opposed Pakistani requests for the transfer of U.S. armed drone technology to Pakistan.

    The Pentagon declined to comment on Pakistan's drone program or the reasons for not giving it U.S. technology.

    Washington is resuming about $1 billion in military aid after freezing it when Pakistan blocked U.S. access to supply lines into Afghanistan. That followed an American border strike that killed 25 Pakistani troops in November 2011. The standoff ended over the summer with a U.S. apology.

    Without advanced satellite technology, the Pakistanis are incapable of developing armed drones by themselves now. It will take years, if not decades, for Pakistan to develop a fleet of armed drones to rival America's Predator and Reaper models, many analysts and people in the industry say.

    "We don't have the capability," said Muhammad Sulaiman, a sales manager for Global Industrial Defense Solutions, or GIDS, a consortium of Pakistani companies that sells drones, tanks and planes to the nation's military. "Maybe Pakistan will need another 50 years."

    To expand its capabilities, Pakistan is looking for help from China, which has marketed its own version of armed drones to developing countries.

    "Pakistan can also benefit from China in defense collaboration, offsetting the undeclared technological apartheid," Pakistan Prime Minister Raja Pervez Ashraf said at a recent arms expo in Karachi, in apparent reference to U.S. reluctance to share its technology with Pakistan.

    GIDS produces one of Pakistan's newest and most advanced drones, a medium-range vehicle called the Shahpar that can fly for about seven hours—a fraction of the 40 hours a Predator can spend in the sky.

    To supplement its nascent drone industry, Pakistan has been working with Italy's Selex Galileo SpA to produce a medium-range Falco drone with limited capabilities that the Pakistani military has been using for surveillance since at least 2009, when the government staged operations against militants based in Swat Valley in northeastern Pakistan.

    While Pakistan has looked to other countries to advance its drone capabilities, one Pakistani company said it has exported a small number of drones to a private company in the U.S.

    Raja Sabri Khan, chief executive of Integrated Dynamics, a Karachi-based drone manufacturer, said he thought the U.S.'s use of armed drones has given the industry a bad name. He aims to help rehabilitate the perception of drones by promoting their peaceful uses, such as the ability to locate flood victims for rescue. "Drones can be used for saving lives, for security," he said. "I'm absolutely against drones for armed purposes."

    Write to Dion Nissenbaum at dion.nissenbaum@wsj.com
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    Last edited by Aryan_B; 19th December 2012 at 08:36.

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    Pakistan Promised Missile Armed Chinese UAVs

    Pakistan recently announced that it would obtain armed UAVs from China. Few other details were revealed. Pakistan has been trying to develop armed UAVs for over six years, without success. China, however, has recently indicated that it has several missiles, especially the Blue Arrow 7 and HJ-10, that are identical in size and performance to the American Hellfire and can be used from UAVs. While these missiles have recently been offered for export, there are no known buyers or indications of how well these missiles actually work. China has also been offering a UAV of similar shape, weight, and performance as the U.S. Predator. Called CH-4, this UAV is similar in shape to the larger American MQ-9 Reaper, while its size is almost identical to the 1.2 ton Predator. CH-4 weighs 1.1 tons, has a 14 meter (46 feet) wingspan, and is 9 meters (28 feet) long. It has max altitude of 5,300 meters (16,400 feet) and an endurance of over 20 hours. This UAV should be able to carry a pair of Blue Arrow 7 missiles. Perhaps Pakistan is just waiting for some successful field tests before buying.
    Over the last five years Pakistan has used several different types of UAVs along the Afghan and Indian borders. The most effective of these has been the Italian Falco UAV, which Pakistan ordered six years ago. The air force completed evaluation of the Falco four years ago and put at least four of them into service. Falco is a 420 kg (924 pound) aircraft with a 68.2 kg (150 pound) payload. Ceiling is 5,000 meters but it usually operates at lower altitudes (2,000 meters). Endurance is up to 12 hours but typical missions are 6-8 hours. Max speed is 210 kilometers an hour, although it usually cruises at 150. Falco can be up to 200 kilometers from its ground station. The UAV can take off and land on an air strip or use a catapult for takeoff and parachute for takeoff and landing.

    Pakistan has also been using several Chinese UAVs for the last decade or so. First, they got the ASN-105, a 140 kg (308 pound) aircraft with a payload of 40 kg (88 pounds) and endurance of only two hours. This is a 1980s era design and has since been replaced by the ASN-206/207. This is a 222 kg (488 pound) aircraft with a 50 kg (110 pound) payload. The 207 model has a max endurance of eight hours but more common is an endurance of four hours. Max range from the control van is 150 kilometers away and cruising speed is about 180 kilometers an hour.

    Pakistan is also developing its own UAVs. Four years ago it tested the Uqaab. This design looks very similar to commercial models. These are smaller (under 250 kg/550 pounds) UAVs for the government and commercial use that have been around since the late 1990s. The Uqaab also appears similar to the U.S. Army RQ-7B Shadow 200. More recently a Pakistani firm has produced the 470 kg (1,034 pound) Shahpar, which can stay in the air seven hours per sortie. This model is very similar to the Chinese CH-3.

    Pakistan requested Predators from the United States, but this was turned down because it was feared that the Chinese would be allowed to dissect the American UAV and acquire too many production secrets. Pakistan and China have been chummy for decades. No secrets between friends and all that. But European nations, like Italy and Germany, have been willing to sell Pakistan unarmed UAVs.

    Warplanes: Pakistan Promised Missile Armed Chinese UAVs

  14. #14
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    CH-3 Unmanned Aerial Vehicle UAV
    General information:


    CH-3 UAV with tricycle landing gear is capable of automatic take-off landing. CH-3 UAV is equipped with reliable active positioning system, anti-jamming data-link system and multipurpose reconnaissance system. It can be applied in operations such as battlefield reconnaissance, data-link, intelligence collection and electronic warfare. In addition, it can be equipped with precision guided weapon to complete reconnaissance and strike missions.

    Features:

    Strong fire-power against massive attack
    Super anti-jamming capability
    Multi-sensor engagement
    Sophisticated high performance missile
    Excellent very low altitude interception
    All-weather operation
    Performance improving based on serialization for potential threats

    Specifications:

    Wingspan: 8 m
    Length: 5.5 m
    Height: 2.4 m
    Maximum take-off weight: 640 kg
    Payload capacity: 100 kg
    Cruising altitude: 3000 - 5000 m
    Celing: 6000 m
    Operating radius: 200 km
    Cruising speed: 220 km/h
    Maximum level speed: 260 km/h
    Maximum endurance: 12 h




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  15. #15
    Think Tank Muse's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    UAV are controlled by satellite communication, since Pakistan do not operate, to the best of my knowledge, any military satellite, how do they control these vehicles, how is data transmitted to.from these ships?

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    Banned RaptorRX's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    UAV are controlled by satellite communication, since Pakistan do not operate, to the best of my knowledge, any military satellite, how do they control these vehicles, how is data transmitted to.from these ships?
    It is same way for Cruise Missiles (i.e Babur/Raad missiles) where Pakistan didn't operate satellite. Turkey had developed Anka UAV without satellite communication, Israelis Heron, Saudi Pastari, South Africa Denel, i think they have concept to use alternative way and Pakistan will compromise with China satellite communication assistance. Even Russia has excellent satellite system and haven't develop their own UAV yet or maybe create one.
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    Member Argus Panoptes's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    UAV are controlled by satellite communication, since Pakistan do not operate, to the best of my knowledge, any military satellite, how do they control these vehicles, how is data transmitted to.from these ships?
    It depends on the range and accuracy of guidance needed. Simple and known tools such as inertial navigation, aided by signals other than satellite based GPS, and two way radio communications, often encrypted, can work very well over shorter ranges with reasonable accuracy.
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    Quote Originally Posted by Argus Panoptes View Post
    It depends on the range and accuracy of guidance needed. Simple and known tools such as inertial navigation, aided by signals other than satellite based GPS, and two way radio communications, often encrypted, can work very well over shorter ranges with reasonable accuracy.
    Pakistan dont have ''attack UAV" only survailance UAV-
    Attack UAV needs real time guidance and human interferance via satellites.
    Survailance UAV needs none of that...
    Flight path can be fed into the autopilot and it will follow waypoints.
    To make it simple and cost effective,landing and takeoff is done by human interaction....But that needs no satellite as at the time its well within range of hand held remote control.
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    Great news , but how many UAV in total has been made ?
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  20. #20
    Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan's Combat Drone & UAV Programs

    Quote Originally Posted by safriz View Post
    Pakistan dont have ''attack UAV" only survailance UAV-
    Attack UAV needs real time guidance and human interferance via satellites.
    Survailance UAV needs none of that...
    Flight path can be fed into the autopilot and it will follow waypoints.
    To make it simple and cost effective,landing and takeoff is done by human interaction....But that needs no satellite as at the time its well within range of hand held remote control.
    Means we are not relying on third parties
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