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    Mod VCheng's Avatar
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    ="text-align:left"> Pakistan United States

    US Radar Ships

    This is a long but interesting article:

    http://foxtrotalpha.jalopnik.com/the...5580823/+damon

    These Are The Wild Radar Ships That Make Missile Defense Possible



    America's complex and costly ballistic missile defense programs regularly make the news, and although land based interceptor launch sites or AEGIS equipped Navy ships get the spotlight, few know of the small fleet of highly specialized sensor ships that have made this controversial technology possible.


    ...............

    Edit: The photographs are very nice, but I am having problems linking them here. PAF Website gives an error about "Failure to create Temporary File" or something like that.
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Re: US Radar Ships

    These Are The Wild Radar Ships That Make Missile Defense Possible


    America's complex and costly ballistic missile defense programs regularly make the news, and although land based interceptor launch sites or AEGIS equipped Navy ships get the spotlight, few know of the small fleet of highly specialized sensor ships that have made this controversial technology possible.


    Whether the focus of a test is shorter ranged theater ballistic missiles or long-range intercontinental ballistic missile with multiple reentry vehicles (MRVs), or even one of our own, we cannot properly learn how to counter or improve them without incredibly accurate and detailed telemetry data. Since ballistic missile tests occur over vast expanses of ocean, fixed-based radars are not ideal for the tracking job. This is where the DoD's pocket fleet of highly customized tracking, test and ballistic missile defense (BMD) support ships comes in to play, some of which have shadowy front-line duties as well.

    USNS Howard O. Lorenzen



    The newest and most powerful missile tracking ship is the USNS Howard O. Lorenzen. This 534-foot long bright white beast packs a pair of state-of-the-art "Cobra King" active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars that are each the size of a three story building and weigh half a million pounds each.

    The Howard O. Lorenzen and her Cobra King radars were developed to replace their extremely successful but dated forerunner duo, the USNS Observation Island and her Cobra Judy phased array radar system. The Cobra King represents a vast improvement in resolution, agility and power handling, and it is said to be more easily upgradable over time, which will hopefully give the Howard O. Lorenzen a long service life like the Observation Island had.

    The Cobra King system included two AESA radar arrays, one in the S band and one X band, that are both controlled via a common operations control station. The S Band array is used for scanning large volumes of sky for objects and for tracking missiles in flight, while the X band array is used for zeroing in on small hard to detect objects like reentry vehicles, missile interceptors, or even tiny satellites. The X band AESA array is especially important as it can help differentiate warheads from decoys, and this data can be used to build software for less capable systems to do the same. In many ways, Cobra King works in a similar fashion to the Navy's soon to be deployed Air and Missile Defense Radar (AMDR), which also has two separate radar arrays, one for X band and one for S band, for volume search and precise tracking. The AMDR will first be deployed on Nuclear Carrier the USS Ford.



    Sea Based X Band Radar (SBX-1)



    The giant SBX-1 is one intimidating contraption. She is built around the frame of a self propelled, semi-submersible drilling platform that can re-position itself anywhere in a hemisphere if need be. Ironically, the self propelled platform that houses the the SBX-1 radar was originally built in Russia before being bought by Boeing and refitted in the US for its current use.

    Inside of its massive white inflatable dome is a four-million-pound X band phased array radar system. This massive piece of radiating technology was designed to provide incredibly detailed tracking of enemy intercontinental ballistic missiles and mid-course updates for ground-based interceptor systems.

    The radar is so powerful and features such a high degree of resolution, that it can differentiate between decoys and warheads during a missile's mid-course separation phase of flight better than any other radar system out there. The information from it is data-linked to command and control stations where a decision will be made to commit interceptors to the missile if its trajectory is deemed a threat. It can then provide highly precise telemetry of those threatening objects to missile interceptors as they ascend toward their target. The system also provides kill assessment data after an intercept has occurred.

    The SBX-1 radar is so powerful that Lt. Gen Obering, at the time the director of the Missile Defense Agency, said that the system is able to track an object the size of a baseball over San Francisco from Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, which is approximately 2,900 miles from radar to target!

    SBX-1 is based up at Adak Island in far western Alaska but she can be re-positioned based on the threat or test at hand, and has done so in the past during missile defense tests and heightened tensions with North Korea. The ability to quickly re-position the SBX-1 is key as it can position itself along the most probable flight paths of hostile missiles. She is often seen in Hawaii for operations and tests or getting serviced in Seattle.

    SBX-1 is both an operational capability and a technology demonstrator, and as America's ballistic missile defense capabilities continue to evolve other SBX platforms may be deployed to different regions so that a persistent network of mid-course commit and differentiation systems can cover large swathes of airspace around the globe.

    USNS Invincible



    USNS Invincible was once as sonar array towing ship and is roughly half the size of the Horward O. Lorenzen. She was refitted in the 1990s and the dish-style "Cobra Gemini" radar system was mounted on her stern, as well as a command center and satellite communications systems.

    Cobra Gemini can work in both S and X bands as well, but not with any anywhere near the power or agility that the Cobra King can, which is not necessarily a handicap considering that this radar system is intended for tracking theater ballistic missiles which have a much shorter range than ICBMs.

    Seeing as short and intermediate ranged ballistic missiles have become a serious threat around the globe, especially in relation to Iran and North Korea, USNS Invincible's ability to closely track their launches makes it a ship that is in extremely high demand.







    Much more on there
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    Re: US Radar Ships

    Quote Originally Posted by Fassi View Post
    These Are The Wild Radar Ships That Make Missile Defense Possible

    ............

    Much more on there
    How were you able to link the images? It was giving me errors.

    Thank you, though.
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    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Re: US Radar Ships

    Quote Originally Posted by VCheng View Post
    How were you able to link the images? It was giving me errors.

    Thank you, though.
    Your welcome I just unticked the box which says Retrieve remote file and reference locally

    and videos as normal
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